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Anti-Aging Testing for Women

Female Ultimate Anti-Aging Panel

Price: $306.99

The Female Ultimate Anti-Aging Panel test is a comprehensive test for adult females used to determine if anti-aging treatment with bioidentical hormone replacement is needed in female patients. A significant deviation from the normal range may require further evaluation by your physician.


Includes:
Lipid Profile: Cholesterol, total; high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol; low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (calculation); triglycerides; very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol (calculation).
Complete Blood Count (CBC) with Differential: (Hematocrit; hemoglobin; mean corpuscular volume (MCV); mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH); mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC); red cell distribution width (RDW); percentage and absolute differential counts; platelet count; red cell count; white blood cell count; immature granulocytes)
Estradiol
Hemoglobin (Hgb) A1c
Cardiac C-Reactive Protein (CRP), High Sensitivity (Cardiac Risk Assessment)
Insulin Growth Factor (IGF-1)
Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT)
Insulin, Fasting
Comprehensive Metabolic Profile (CMP) (includes eGFR)
: (A:G ratio; albumin, serum; alkaline phosphatase, serum; ALT (SGPT); AST (SGOT); bilirubin, total; BUN; BUN:creatinine ratio; calcium, serum; carbon dioxide, total; chloride, serum; creatinine, serum; globulin, total; glucose, serum; potassium, serum; protein, total, serum; sodium, serum.)
Luteinizing Hormone(LH)
Testosterone, Serum (Total Only)
Sex Hormone binding Globulin, Serum
Urinalysis, Routine Profile
: Color, appearance, specific gravity, pH, protein, glucose, ketones, occult blood, leukocyte esterase, nitrite, bilirubin, and urobilinogen. These tests are done on all routine urinalysis ordered and if protein, leukocyte, occult blood, nitrite, and turbidity are all negative, microscopic examination is not performed; just the above parameters are reported. (If results are abnormal test will reflex to include microscopic examination).
Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH)
Magnesium, Serum
Thyroxine Free, Direct (FT4)
Iron, Serum w/TIBC
: Percent of saturation; serum iron; total iron binding capacity; unsaturated iron binding capacity
Progesterone
Cancer Antigen (CA) 125
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate (DHEA-S)


Note: If testosterone levels are expected to be >1500, it is best that you order a panel that includes Testosterone LC/MS-MS as the testosterone test included in this panel has a cutoff of 1500.


Patient Instructions: Patient should fast for 12-14 hours before collection of the specimen. If using a testosterone cream please be sure you have not rubbed any into the antecubital area of your arm for the last 24 hours as it can give elevated results.
   

Female Ultimate Anti-Aging Panel w/F&T Testosterone

Price: $336.99

The Female Ultimate Anti-Aging Panel with Free and Total Testosterone test is a comprehensive test for adult females used to determine if anti-aging treatment with bioidentical hormone replacement is needed in female patients. It differs from the Female Ultimate Anti-Aging Panel by changing the Total Testosterone test to a Testosterone, Free (Direct) with Total Testosterone, LC/MS-MS test. A significant deviation from the normal range may require further evaluation by your physician.


Includes:
Lipid Profile: Cholesterol, total; high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol; low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (calculation); triglycerides; very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol (calculation).
Complete Blood Count (CBC) with Differential: (Hematocrit; hemoglobin; mean corpuscular volume (MCV); mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH); mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC); red cell distribution width (RDW); percentage and absolute differential counts; platelet count; red cell count; white blood cell count; immature granulocytes)
Estradiol
Hemoglobin (Hgb) A1c
C-Reactive Protein (CRP), High Sensitivity (Cardiac Risk Assessment),
Insulin Growth Factor (IGF-1)
Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT)
Insulin, Fasting

Comprehensive Metabolic Profile (CMP) (includes eGFR): (A:G ratio; albumin, serum; alkaline phosphatase, serum; ALT (SGPT); AST (SGOT); bilirubin, total; BUN; BUN:creatinine ratio; calcium, serum; carbon dioxide, total; chloride, serum; creatinine, serum; globulin, total; glucose, serum; potassium, serum; protein, total, serum; sodium, serum.)
Luteinizing Hormone(LH)
Testosterone, Free (Direct) With Total Testosterone, LC/MS-MS
Sex Hormone binding Globulin, Serum

Urinalysis, Routine Profile: Color, appearance, specific gravity, pH, protein, glucose, ketones, occult blood, leukocyte esterase, nitrite, bilirubin, and urobilinogen. These tests are done on all routine urinalysis ordered and if protein, leukocyte, occult blood, nitrite, and turbidity are all negative, microscopic examination is not performed; just the above parameters are reported. (If results are abnormal test will reflex to include microscopic examination).
Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH)
Magnesium, Serum
Thyroxine Free, Direct (FT4)

Iron, Serum w/TIBC: Percent of saturation; serum iron; total iron binding capacity; unsaturated iron binding capacity
Progesterone
Cancer Antigen (CA) 125
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate (DHEA-S)

Note: Actual Total Testosterone levels will be provided with this test if levels exceed 1500.


Patient Instructions: Patient should fast for 12-14 hours before collection of the specimen. If using a testosterone cream please be sure you have not rubbed any into the antecubital area of your arm for the last 24 hours as it can give elevated results.

Estimated turnaround for results is 7 business days. If confirmation testing is required, the estimated time may be extended.
   


What is a Female Anti-Aging Panel?

The Female Anti-Aging Panel tests patients for hormone levels associated with aging, also establishing baselines for hormones which include estradiol and progesterone, in order to diagnose menopause in women. The symptoms associated with menopause are treatable through hormone replacement therapy and are recommended by means of establishing a hormonal baseline after having a Female Anti-Aging Panel performed.

Who May Need a Female Anti-Aging Panel?

As a female ages, certain hormone levels in her body decrease while others increase. Some of these hormones help females maintain their health, vigor and youthful appearance. Lower levels of specific hormones in a female patient result in signs of aging, though they can be mostly overcome or delayed through bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. These therapies can be implemented by determining what particular hormones are not being adequately produced and can have a profound effect on the anti-aging process as a whole.

What Should I Expect from My Female Anti-Aging Panel?

A Female Anti-Aging Panel can help a physician and their patient determine what hormone levels are insufficient, as well as what stage of menopause a patient may be in, which gives physicians the ability to approach treatment specific to the individual. It can also offer female patients information on physical symptoms they may be experiencing, as well as whether or not they can be attributed to menopause. In addition to testing for these hormones, the Female Anti-Aging Panel also gives individuals an overall view of their general health status.

What is Menopausal Hormone Therapy?

Menopausal hormone therapy is a treatment that can relieve the symptoms many women have during menopause. Regular doses of hormones are taken to replace some of the natural hormones that decrease at menopause. The 2 main female hormones are estrogen and progesterone.
Menopause is the time when menstruation stops permanently. It is usually a gradual process, but it can occur suddenly in some cases. The ovaries begin to produce fewer hormones. The reduced amount of hormone causes menstrual periods to become irregular. Eventually they stop completely. Menopause can also suddenly occur when the ovaries are surgically removed.
Menopause is part of a natural aging process and not a disease. For many women menopause is an easy change, but some women have problems caused by the decrease in hormones, particularly by the decrease in estrogen. These problems may be helped by treatment that replaces some of the lost hormone.
If your uterus has been removed, you may take estrogen alone. If you still have your uterus, taking estrogen alone increases your risk of cancer of the uterus. Your provider will recommend taking progesterone with estrogen to reduce this risk.
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may be taken as:

  • tablets to be swallowed
  • patches or lotion to be put on the skin
  • a vaginal ring
  • a cream to be put into the vagina
  • pellets placed under the skin
  • shots

When is Menopausal Hormone Therapy Used?

You may never have symptoms of menopause, or they may occur for a few weeks, for a few months, or sometimes over several years. Your symptoms may come and go, or they may occur regularly. Your health care provider might recommend hormone therapy to relieve the following symptoms, especially if they are very severe:

  • hot flashes
  • night sweats
  • vaginal dryness, which can cause discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse

Until recently hormone therapy has been used to help prevent loss of bone density (osteoporosis). However, the routine use of HRT to prevent osteoporosis is no longer recommended. There are other, safer treatments for osteoporosis.
Sometimes hormones may be recommended for women who go through menopause early (before the age of 40). Removal of the ovaries causes a sudden decrease in hormones and early menopause.
You and your health care provider should discuss the risks and benefits of HRT for you. Factors such as your age, race, family history, and health history must be considered. Hormone therapy can help some of the symptoms of menopause, but it can increase the risk for heart disease or stroke. It can also increase the risk of breast cancer and blood clots.

What are the Benefits of Menopausal Hormone Therapy?

  • Relief of menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness
  • Prevention and treatment of osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a disease that thins and weakens bones. This makes it easier for the bones to break. Bone loss begins around age 35. You start losing bone more quickly at menopause. Hormone therapy can slow down bone loss if it is begun soon after menopause. However, your provider may prescribe other medicines to help prevent osteoporosis. Weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, and calcium supplements with vitamin D can also help to reduce bone loss.

What are the Risks of Menopausal Hormone Therapy?

The risks of hormone therapy include:

  • Uterine cancer: Estrogen taken without progesterone increases the risk of cancer of the uterus. To lessen this risk, health care providers prescribe estrogen combined with progesterone if you have not had your uterus removed.
  • Breast cancer: Estrogen taken with progesterone (Prempro) increases the risk of breast cancer. Talk to your provider about this risk. Many providers recommend that women be checked thoroughly for any tumors and have a mammogram before beginning HRT. If you have a family history of breast cancer, it is especially important to discuss this with your provider. Estrogen taken alone appears to have no significant effect on the risk of breast cancer.
  • Cardiovascular disease, strokes, and blood clots in the legs and lungs: Estrogen and progesterone taken together increase the risk of heart attack, strokes, and blood clots. When estrogen is taken alone, the risk of coronary heart disease does not seem to change, but the risk of stroke is higher than it is in women who are not taking HRT.

Hormone therapy may also increase your risk for some gallbladder problems and dementia.
The risks of all forms of HRT are continuing to be studied. The risks described above may be different for hormone therapy that involves lower doses of estrogen and progesterone or progesterone only. You and your health care provider should discuss the risks and benefits of hormone therapy for you.

What are the Side Effects of Menopausal Hormone Therapy?

The side effects of hormone therapy may include:

  • uterine bleeding or vaginal discharge if your uterus has not been removed
  • bloating, fluid retention, and weight gain
  • breast tenderness and enlargement
  • nausea
  • symptoms like those of premenstrual tension (PMS), such as headaches and mood swings. when progesterone is part of the treatment
  • abnormal blood clotting
  • headache

If your therapy includes both estrogen and progesterone, you will usually have some vaginal bleeding if there are days in the cycle when you are not taking hormones. Not a menstrual period, the bleeding typically lasts 2 or 3 days. Usually you will not have any cramps with the bleeding. If you take both estrogen and progesterone in low doses every day, the hormones will not cause bleeding except perhaps some spotting of blood for the first 2 to 3 months.

Who Should Not Take Menopausal Hormone Therapy?

Hormone therapy is not recommended for women who have any of these conditions, diseases, or medical history:

  • heart attack or stroke
  • uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • blood clots in the legs, lungs, or eyes
  • cancer of the breast or uterus
  • unexplained vaginal bleeding
  • liver disease

You should not take hormones if you are or think you may be pregnant.
Also, if you smoke, you should avoid hormone therapy. Smoking may increase your risk of heart attack or stroke while you are taking hormones.
If you have any of the following diseases or conditions, you should discuss with your provider the effect of hormone therapy on these conditions:

  • uterine fibroids (These benign tumors may grow in response to estrogen. They begin to shrink at menopause unless you are taking estrogen.)
  • endometriosis
  • fibrocystic breast disease
  • migraine headaches
  • gallbladder disease

What Can I Do to Take Care of Myself?

If you are thinking about taking hormones:

  • Talk to your health care provider about the risks and benefits.
  • Get a mammogram before you begin HRT to check for breast cancer. Then get a mammogram every 1 to 2 years, according to your provider's recommendation.

Ask your health care provider about:

  • the different types and dosages of hormone therapy
  • any side effects or special precautions you should know about while you are taking hormones
  • when you should start and stop the taking hormones

If you are already taking hormones:

  • Ask your provider about any special precautions or side effects.
  • If you are taking estrogen combined with progesterone, tell your provider if bleeding occurs at any time other than the days when you do not take the hormones.
  • Be sure to have a yearly pelvic exam with a Pap test.
  • Do not change your hormone dose without checking with your provider.
  • Eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly according to your provider's recommendations.
  • Do not smoke.
  • Have a mammogram every year. Examine your breasts monthly.
  • Have a complete physical exam every year. Your blood should be tested regularly for cholesterol levels and liver function.

Questions regarding online blood testing or how to order a lab test?

Speak with One of Our Representatives: 1-877-283-7882

 

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